How to Restring RV Shades

If you have day/night shades in your RV, the string inside eventually wears. Once wearing starts, one side can start to droop or not stay up at all. What happens next is that one of the string inside finally snaps. 

Your options are:

  1. Replace the shades (Really expensive)
  2. Find a window covering store to repair the shades (Expensive but ok if you just don't like fixing stuff)
  3. Restring the shades yourself

Of course, I recommend the third option. I figured out how to do it myself and will show you how to do it too. Restringing your day/night shades is very inexpensive and not very difficult once you've figured it out.  

I put together this video to show you that this is certainly something you can do yourself.

Here is a useful tip: Take time to study the string configuration on your shades before you disassemble them. Maybe even take a picture of it. It may help when restringing. 
 

Before you start here's what you'll need

  1. About 20 yards of 1.2mm or 1.4mm string (you can get it from your craft or fabric store or order online from fixmyblinds.com). The length you'll need will vary depend on the size of your window. So it's better to get more than you need. I got about 25 yards for around $7.
  2. A flat head screw driver (to remove the plastic end caps)
  3. Scissors (to cut the string)
  4. Thin gauge wire or large fabric needle (for feeding the string through the blinds)
 
Shade Cord

I found this 100 foot roll of cord on Amazon for around $20. It's always better to have too much rather than too little. Plus, once you get the hang of it, you will end up restringing the other shades in your RV when they wear out. Here's a link if you would like to get one of these rolls from Amazon.

Buy this on Amazon

You're ready to restring your shades

First I recommend you take a few minutes and watch the video first (above) as it walks you through the process. Then slowly disassemble your shades paying close attention to where the strings go. When you are ready to begin restringing use the diagram below (from fixmyblinds.com) as a reference. It illustrates the typical 4 string configuration that you'll probably find in your typical day/night shade.

 

When I took apart the wide upper bunk window shade, however, I discovered that the configuration was a little different from the standard size window I did first. On the wider window, there were two springs (one per side) and the 4 string threading was different. So be sure to inspect the string configuration to make sure you reassemble it correctly.
 

Standard Window (after)
Bunk Window (after)

So go ahead and give this project a shot. You'll be happy with the result and you're shades will operate just like new.

Good luck!
 

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